Soled | Jena Kitley

‘Soled’, is a super interesting project from London based designer, Jena Kitley.

“A collaborative project which involved creating a template for people in less developed countries to make their own footwear using local materials available to them.

Cutting tyres is a regular activity completed by the locals. The tread would be stripped off the tyre.

The final shoe design has been created to incorporate minimal stitching with one piece of tyre being used for the sole of the shoe and to protect the toes. The hemp strap at the back keeps the shoe secured to the foot whilst there are air-holes to allow the feet to breath in the hot climate conditions.

The template, created from recyclable polypropylene, would be placed directly on the cut tyre piece. The template shows a variety of shoe sizes, the user can find their shoe size by placing their foot on the template. Once their shoe size is determined, the user can follow the step by step illustrations and using the list of accessible tools to cut out the sole of the shoe. After the sole has been cut out, there are further instructions to make the back strap from the burlap sacks, sewn using hemp rope.

The template would be sent out and distributed through a charity, the concept is open source and has the ability to be transferred online as well as being a physical product.

Local people would be shown how to make the shoe and this information would be passed on throughout the community, and thus creating business. There are unlimited possibilities as to the materials they could use, the tyres, burlap sacks and hemp rope are just a starting point, they can alter the design and materials to their own preference.” – Jena

Check out the Soled concept in-full, below.
 

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Mr. Bailey

Product Designer + Footwear Architect | Founder of @ConceptKicks | www.MrBailey.co.uk

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